Aylesbury Blend

Size
Quantity

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Region
Brazil, Colombia, Guatemalan
Taste Notes
Cocao, toasted nut, red berry, nougat

We recommend this coffee is best used as an Espresso.

Our Classic Medium roasted espresso blend combining  Brazillian, Colombian and Guatemalan beans, to create a solid all rounder as either espresso or in milk. 

Guatemala
Huehuetenango Finca La Providencia

Finca La Providencia’s location and elevation gives it an advantage in producing a very high quality coffee. The farm’s water resources are abundant, with several springs across the area, and the region has distinct wet and dry seasons, which are beneficial for flowering and processing. Farming in Huehuetenango, however, is not without its challenges. The topography of the farm is broken and very irregular, which makes harvesting and cultivation activities more laborious. Fertilisation of the clay loam soil must be done with stringent attention to detail in order to avoid ‘washing’ and erosion. For this reason, nearly 30% of the farm is kept under native forest, which helps prevent soil washing down the steep inclines and preserves the local ecology.

Brazil
Sáo Silvestre 

The farm’s volcanic soils provide ideal conditions for growing the farm’s main varieties - Yellow Icatú, Yellow Bourbon and Típica. The beans are harvested when ripe and prepared using the pulped natural process: the cherries are pulped, and the mucilage is left on the beans while they are dried. Depending on climactic conditions, the coffee is either totally sun-dried or completed in two stages where the beans are initially sun dried, bringing the moisture content down to approximately 20%, and then finished in mechanical dryers, bringing the moisture content of the beans to a maximum of 12%.

Colombia 
La Plata Huila

Whilst Huila is naturally blessed with optimal coffee growing geography, the key to great quality coffees from the La Plata region (such as this lot) are the growers themselves. Coffee farming within the region is overwhelmingly small-scale. Indeed, approximately 80% of producers from the region farm coffee on less than 3 hectares of land. These small farms are tended by individual families with labour only very rarely being contracted out, which leads to more thorough and intensive management practices and great pride in the final product – which is, itself, an extension of the family.